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Social Practice Art the Gestalt of CURRENT:LA

A recent mayoral announcement officially launched the Department of Cultural Affairs’ new Current:LA initiative, an issues-driven public art biennial whose inaugural edition happens at non-traditional locations scattered across the city in July and August. The first edition, Current:LA Water, addresses the multivalent topic of water’s usage, history, and role in the city’s physical and social infrastructure. This includes the L.A. River, but as the organizers are quick to point out, it is about so much more than just the river.

Inside the Studio of Alumnus Kerry James Marshall with Artsy

No one’s going to let you into the art world. This is a reality that Kerry James Marshall ('78 Fine Arts), one of America’s most esteemed painters, whose numerous accolades will be burnished this year with a major retrospective at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago (MCA Chicago) that later travels to the new Met Breuer in New York and MOCA in Los Angeles, knows well.

Fine Arts Faculty Exhibiting in Current:LA

Fine Arts faculty members Kori Newkirk and Joshua Callaghan have been selected for the City of LA's first public art biennial, Current:LA. More than a dozen artists were chosen for the inaugural biennial which hopes to democratize the way people access art by featurin

Faculty Karen Moss Part of Curatorial Team Behind CURRENT:LA

More than a dozen artists — including L.A.-based Kori Newkirk, Edgar Arceneaux, Gala Porras-Kim and Michael Parker — have been selected to participate in Los Angeles' first public art biennial, Mayor Eric Garcetti announced at a news conference early Tuesday afternoon.

The "Current:LA Water" exhibition will consist of temporary outdoor installations that will go up throughout the city this summer, all focused on the theme of water.

'Grid' Featured in Frieze Magazine's Critic's Guide for Los Angeles

Curator Kate McNamara’s inaugural exhibition at Otis College’s Ben Maltz Gallery references the modernist interest in the grid as a map of time, movement and sound. It also showcases a number of contemporary artists who utilize it as a performative strategy.

Cathy Lightfoot's Sensation of Color

In 2013, Cathy Lightfoot, Adjunct Associate Professor, started an informal exploration of color relationships in her sketchbook. A painter, Lightfoot used the series of informal gouache exercises to explore color gradations, and color relationships that appear to generate light energy. The project grew into a focused and systematic investigation numbering over 120 gouache paintings that she intended to arrange in combinations for use when planning her larger paintings.

LA Times Features Alumni Steve Roden

The 10 new paintings in Steve Roden’s ('86 BFA Fine Arts) “A Year Without Painting” at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects look as if they were made in a rush — and not for the usual reasons.

Huffington Post Features Alumnus Sandow Birk

Southern California has a thriving and eclectic fine arts scene, and the husband-wife team of painter Sandow Birk ('88 Fine Arts) and ceramicist Elyse Pignolet are two of the region's finest visual artists. Birk and Pignolet are notable for capturing the zeitgeist of California and the nation in clever and unique ways. Birk's In Smog and Thunder: The Great War of the Californias, which exhibited at the Laguna Art Museum in 2000 and Sonoma Art Museum in 2001, depicts an imaginary war between San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Alumna Keiko Fukazawa exhibit Made in China Reviewed by LA Times

Keiko Fukazawa's ('86 MFA Ceramics) "Spout Monster #1" is an unassuming little smart bomb, a precision-guided work of art that explodes aesthetic conventions by uncovering buried social and political content in ordinary found objects.

The porcelain sculpture, included in the modest but captivating survey of Fukazawa's recent ceramics newly opened at the Craft and Folk Art Museum, is composed from two shallow, footed bowls. They are stacked rim to rim and fused together in the kiln, looking like a little flying saucer.

Performing the Grid Featured in ARTFORUM

There’s nothing more satisfying than a grid, at least for those daunted by the blank page of unfettered creative freedom. But perhaps the latter is an illusion, and no attempt at creativity exists without constraint.

The sixteen artists in “Performing the Grid,” for instance, take full pleasure in being line-bound.

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