Events
  • Viet Thanh Nguyen’s bestselling novel The Sympathizer won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, the First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction, and a Carnegie Medal from the American Library Association. It was also a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. Nguyen is also the author of Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America and Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War.

  • Tonya Foster

    Sep 21| Lectures
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    Poet Tonya Foster is the author of the collection A Swarm of Bees in High Court. Her work has appeared in nocturnes, Callaloo, Traffic, Gulf Coast, and other journals. Her essays have appeared in NY Arts Magazine, NYFA Quarterly and The Poetry Project Newsletter. A co-editor of Third Mind: Teaching Creative Writing Through Visual Art, Foster teaches at California College of the Arts and lives in the Bay Area.

  • Steven Ehrlich and Frederick Fisher will present their firms’ collaboration as EHRLICH | FISHER on Otis College’s new Goldsmith Campus Academic Building and Residence Hall. The campus-wide expansion and renovation project includes a new academic building, 300-seat Forum (the venue for this lecture), café and dining commons, Student Life Center, and residence hall.

     

  • Opening Reception

    Sep 24| Special Event
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    New York-based artist Polly Apfelbaum’s work has situated itself as a hybrid of painting, sculpture, and installation over a career spanning 30 plus years. Exploring the intricacies of color, Apfelbaum weaves her way, both literally and conceptually, through ideas of Minimalism, Pop aesthetics, and Color Field painting to blur the lines between two and three dimensional art making.

  • Artist Polly Apfelbaum in conversation with Connie Butler, within Apfelbaum's exhibition Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

     

  • John Keene

    Oct 05| Lectures
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    John Keene is the author of the novels Annotations and Counternarratives, as well as several other works, including the poetry collection Seismosis, with artist Christopher Stackhouse, and a translation of Brazilian author Hilda Hilst's novel Letters from a Seducer. The recipient of a Whiting Award, Keene has been a member of the Dark Room Writers Collective and a Cave Canem fellow. He has served as the managing editor of Callaloo and taught at Northwestern. He currently teaches at Rutgers University-Newark and lives in New York.

  • Artist Polly Apfelbaum in conversation with David Pagel, within Apfelbaum's exhibition Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

     

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faculty

Faculty Maura Bendett Featured in Artillery Magazine

As a student, seeking respite from the relatively hidebound painting department, I often retreated to the sculpture studios. There, the critical gaze of teachers seemed less intense; sculpture students did as they pleased. Around that time about a decade ago, I took Beginning Sculpture from Krysten Cunningham, who fostered critical dialogue around fundamental techniques of welding and casting.

ArtNet Features New Work from Faculty Andrea Bowers

When activism finds its way into the art gallery, the house style is what Paige Sarlin calls "new left-wing melancholy," or what I think of as “post-radical chic:" neutralized and neutralizing, mining the paraphernalia of protest for historical pathos. This is not the way Andrea Bowers operates, as you can confirm for yourself if you visit the LA artist's show at Andrew Kreps Gallery in Chelsea, dubbed “Whose Feminism Is It Anyway?"
 

Public Practice Chair Suzanne Lacy Demystifies Social Practice Art for New York Times

Carmen Papalia’s M.F.A. project doesn’t look much like art. For “Blind Field Shuttle,” he led his classmates across the Portland State campus in Oregon on an eyes-closed walking tour, single file, each with a hand on the shoulder of the person in front.

For the first half of the 40-minute walk, some nervous participants had panic attacks, or cried. Mr. Papalia talked about what they were passing — a fire hydrant, a brick wall, a fence — and the vulnerability they were feeling.

Faculty Dave Schultze Receives Toy of the Year Nomination

The ‘Black Light Illuminator’, created by Toy Design faculty Dave Schultze, has been nominated for the prestigious ‘Toy of the Year’ honor by the Toy Industry Association (TIA) jury.

For Schultze, owner and founder of SchultzeWORKS designstudio, this is the third Toy of the Year nomination in the last four years. The Illuminator has also been awarded the Oppenheim Toy Portfolio Platinum Seal Award for 2015.

Strong Otis Showing at Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery in SKIN

Curated by Isabelle Lutterodt, the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery's upcoming exhibition SKIN examines the work of 36 contemporary artists who are inspiring dialogue about race and identity, while challenging the very definitions.

Kerri Steinberg's Jewish Mad Men

“The public is aware that advertising is dominant within our lives, but it’s only when you understand how it works can you begin to talk back to it,” says Kerri Steinberg, Liberal Arts and Sciences faculty member and author of Jewish Mad Men: Advertising and the Design of the American Jewish Experience.

Alumnus Noe Gaytan and Faculty Andrea Bowers featured in Artbound's Art and Protest

Graduate Public Practice faculty member Andrea Bowers and alumnus Noe Gaytan ('15 MFA) are featured in the Artbound episode 'Art and Protest'. The episode, "explores art created amid social upheaval, including: the social practice of Andrea Bowers and Noe Gaytan, whose work engages with the struggle for wage equity and unionization".

Public Practice Chair Suzanne Lacy's Performance on Gender-Based Violence Featured by Huffington Post

In Ecuador, roughly one in six women have experienced physical, sexual or psychological violence. To put it another way, 3 million Ecuadorians have counted themselves a victim of gender-based violence in their lifetime. According to the same Pan American Health Organization research, 38 percent of women in Ecuador have been physically abused, 26 percent sexually abused, and 17 percent have been victims of patrimonial violence. These statistics, however bleak, are still merely numbers. Numbers that look eerily similar to statistics across the globe.

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