Events
  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 4:00 - 5:00 pm is Welcome to the Haunted Boulevard. Join DJ Platinum (Grace Potter) and DJ Batsy (Jessi Hita) for a journey of the folklores, urban legends, and paranormal encounters from different cultures. 

     

    Listen online at KLMU.

  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

  • Mexican artist Yoshua Okón’s videos blur the lines between documentary, reality, and fiction. He collaborates closely with his actors (often amateurs who are also the subjects of the work) to create sociological examinations that ask viewers to contemplate uncomfortable situations and circumstances.
  • Dana Johnson is the author of the short story collection In the Not Quite Dark. She is also the author of Break Any Woman Down, winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, and the novel Elsewhere, California.

  • Gallery 169 will be hosting the Otis College of Art and Design Communication Arts Graphic Design Junior Show, "5328," displaying a selection of work made over the five thousand twenty eight hours that make up the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Work will include collected posters, publications, and typographic projects.
  • Clay, Body is a solo exhibition from artist Sydney Aubert: Unapologetically fat, crass, and sexual, a ceramics artist who also works in video, and whatever other materials arouse her in the moment. Exhibition will be on view from Monday, April 24 - Friday, April 28 at the Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design. On view by appointment only, please contact the artist at sydney.aubert@gmail.com Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6pm-9pm Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design

  • Audrey Wollen is a feminist theorist and visual artist based in Los Angeles. Wollen uses social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, as platforms for her work on Sad Girl Theory, a theory which posits that internalized female sadness can be used as a radical and political action, separate from masculinized forms of protests such as anger and violence. She introduces this form of protest as an alternative to masculinized anger and violence.

O-Tube

Fine Arts

Assistant Chair Annetta Kapon Receives Greek Diaspora Fellowship

LOS ANGELES – Annetta Kapon, assistant chair of the graduate fine arts program at Otis College of Art and Design has been chosen for the first round in the Greek Diaspora Fellowship Program. Kapon will travel to Greece to work with professor Marios Spiliopoulos in the graduate program at the Athens School of Fine Arts. Her work will focus on curriculum development, teaching, graduate student mentoring, and strengthening international connections for graduate students and faculty.

Don't Miss These End-of-the-Year Shows

Above: Students exploring Joint Venture at the DAC Gallery. Photo: Allison Knight

Making a Statement at Miami Art Week

Art Basel in Miami Beach, and the adjoining fairs, parties, and shows that converge in Miami, offers an annual sampling of contemporary art and culture. Acting as a barometer of the art world, attendees were able to view well-established and emerging artists alike.

'LA Weekly': The Explosive Way a Pair of Artists Stood Up to Cultural Stereotyping...

Reprinted from LA Weekly Tuesday, November 29, 2016

"On a Sunday in mid-November, just days after the election of Donald Trump, David Roy and Forouzan Safari drove from L.A. to the desert outside Victorville for an amateur rocket launch. 

'Cultured Magazine': 30 Young Artists To Watch In 2017

Reprinted from Culture Magazine November 2016

"We spent the summer refining and debating who should be included in our first-ever “30 Under 35” list. In order to narrow it down, we captured the country’s pulse by limiting our focus to its two culture capitals—Los Angeles and New York. Here, in alphabetical order, our names to watch in 2017, from Kelly Akashi to Stewart Uoo.

Five Thoughts About Living From Artist Andrea Zittel

“Her work is about generosity. It says yes to life, and what more could we ask for?” said Meg Cranston, chair of fine arts at Otis College of Art and Design, in her introduction of artist Andrea Zittel. Zittel, the Fine Arts' 2016-2017 Critic-in-Residence presented ‘How to Live?’, a lecture in which she described several of her works rooted in investigating the structures and conditions of daily life.

From LA Streets to Gallery Walls

"Graffiti is the foundation on which we built our artistic practices. But beyond graffiti, Los Angeles is what unifies us," says Gajin Fujita ('97 Fine Arts). The Boyle Heights native brings together 11 artists, including himself, for a crash-course in L.A. street-inspired art. Repping different neighborhoods and influenced by different cultures, their works join to create a layered, vibrant, and at times irreverent vision of Los Angeles, which couldn't come at a better time. Roll Call opens today at the L.A.

Kerry James Marshall's Mastry

(above Untitled (Studio) 2014 © Kerry James Marshall / Courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

'T Magazine': Kerry James Marshall Is Shifting the Color of Art History

Reprinted from T Magazine, October 17, 2016 

Artist Andrea Zittel on 'How to Live?'

Why do we choose to live the way we do? This is the question at the core of artist Andrea Zittel's work. Zittel, the Fine Arts' 2016-2017 Critic-in-Residence will address these issues in 'How to Live?", a public lecture on October 20, 2016, at 7:30pm at Otis College of Art and Design. 

Pages