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Events
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • Exquisite Beauty is the first retrospective and publication to document the eye-dazzling ceramics created by Ralph Bacerra (1938–2008), a Los Angeles–based artist known for his innovative approach to surface embellishment. Curated by Jo Lauria, the exhibition features more than ninety of the artist’s finest pieces—dramatic, highly decorated vessels and sculptures that have never before been the focus of a major exhibition or publication.

  • Opening Reception for Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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Graduate Graphic Design Course

Theory and Criticism

A diversity of critical approaches to twentieth and twenty-first century design are situated historically while introducing current themes and debates in contemporary design practice and related disciplines.

Visiting Artists Critique

This course offers one-on-one studio critiques with visiting artists. The focus is on the individual student’s practice. In-depth discussion with artists and designers give students the opportunity to strengthen their conceptual and aesthetic development.

Seminar II

GRDS500/600/700   6 credits/6 credits/6 credits

In this three-term course sequence, all graduate students work on project-specific assignments. Faculty and visiting artists provide the opportunity for in-depth discussion, conceptual and formal investigation. The intention of this course is to find focus and specialization in the program.

Directed Studies

 

Directed Study: Mentorship (Spring Semester)

GRDS799   3.5 - 9 credits

Students produce academic texts related to design that are historical, critical, and/or theoretical. Through mentorship, students will begin to establish a body of work that can and should contribute to contemporary design discourse. Communication via digital technologies, telephone, or face-to-face meetings all contribute to the mentorship process. Publication material in digital or analog form is required.

 

Studio Topics: Advancing the Discipline

GRDS640/641/642   2 credits/2 credits/2 credits

Students will cultivate personal working methodologies and develop and test them throughout the course. Careful examinations of current/previous design vanguards with particular attention to the relationship between method and form. Students will produce a series of projects and will be critiqued throughout the semesters by peers and faculty/guest faculty.

Studio Topics: Social Responsibility of the Designer

GRDS630/631/632   2 credits/2 credits/2 credits

This course defines “social responsibility” as a nuanced and contextual idea, one whose meaning is constantly evolving and whose manifestations shift between cultures and generations. Specific project topics and themes rotate by semester. All projects involve an intensive research component that includes both informational and formal/visual research (collecting and making).

Studio Topics Typography and Type Design

GRDS620/621/622   2 credits/2 credits/2 credits

The projects assigned use theory, methodology, and personal interests to expand student‚ knowledge of typography and its role within graphic design. Each section will host a visiting type designer who will workshop with the students and establish the beginnings of designing a typeface.

Contemporary Graphic Design Issues

This course is total emersion into the field of graphic design. Current and critically important figures be covered, students will be given tools to use in their practice to ensure that they are informed on the discipline on a global scale. In addition, students will begin to engage visiting artists in dialogue during lectures.

Seminar I

GRDS500/600/700   6 credits/6 credits/6 credits

In this three-term course sequence, all graduate students work on project-specific assignments. Faculty and visiting artists provide the opportunity for in-depth discussion, conceptual and formal investigation. The intention of this course is to find focus and specialization in the program.

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