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  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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Waste not, want more

Two years ago, Otis fashion design students Han-Na Aku Jun and Sanna Ho turned disposability, one of fashion’s fundamental truths, on its head.

A long-held industry belief was that if garments didn’t go out of style each season, designers would be out of work.

As part of Otis’ partnership with Hurley and Nike, these students used Nike’s Considered index to design a series of appealing high fashion garments designed to do the unthinkable—keep consumers from returning to the store.

Features such as reversible fabrics and ties instead of zippers give these garments an extendable life, making the outfits wearable day after day, season after season, and year after year. Detachable collars and cuffs minimize trips to the cleaners, and when a hood transforms into a dress, the garment can go from the hiking trail to the haute couture runway in a moment. And fashion isn’t the only aspect of the apparel that’s sustainable.

The resulting clothes are so reusable and trend-proof that some designers might consider the Considered index an act of self sabotage. But Otis’ Fashion Design Chair Rosemary Brantley calls it “the most inspiring project in all the years I have spent at Otis.”

At Otis, you’ll work with designers who view art as a world with no rules; who have the fearlessness and integrity to create fashion that’s visionary, even when what’s visionary isn’t fashionable—yet.

Learn more about Fashion Design at Otis