Otis College of Art and Design logo
Events
  • Warren Neidich

    Aug 28| Lectures
    More

    Warren Neidich is a Berlin and Los Angeles based post-conceptual artist, theorist and writer who explores the interfaces between cultural production, brain research and cognitive capitalism. “Art Before Philosophy not After”. His interdisciplinary works combines photographic, video, internet downloads, scotch tape  and noise installations.

    www.warrenneidich.com

  • Rendering female models and celebrities on large-scale canvases and with quick, expressive brushstrokes, painter Katherine Bernhardt examines representations of beauty in mainstream media and fashion photography. She paints her subjects with severe, exaggerated features and emaciated limbs that sometimes morph into abstraction, recalling the works of Pablo Picasso. “Some people ask if I hate the models I paint,” she says. “I say no, I don't hate them.

  • UpCycle Day 2014!

    Sep 03| Special Event
    More

    Join us for the 3rd Annual UpCycle Day!

    Learn about the Resource Exchange

    Bring your excess supplies and materials to share and trade. 

    Stock up for the school year with Free supplies and materials. 

    Help divert our collective waste from ending up in landfills.

     

  • Jan Brandt

    Sep 04| Lectures
    More
  • Joel Kyack

    Sep 09| Lectures
    More
    JOEL KYACK Lives and works in Los Angeles.

    ghebaly.com/artists/joel-kyack

  • A dynamic portrait of the life of computer prodigy Aaron Swartz who championed free speech and data sharing, this must-see documentary premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah and was the opening night film at the 2014 Hot Docs International Film Festival in Toronto, Canada. 

    We're excited the film’s director Brian Knappenberger will be our special guest speaker for the Q & A moderated by Movies that Matter series producers Judy Arthur and Perri Chasin after the screening. 

  • Koenraad Dedobbeleer lives and works in Brussels.

     

O-Tube

What To Include In The Grantee Report

Prior to reimbursement for your grant expenses, please type up a short report about your funded project suitable for posting on this website. For examples of what others have done, see the Faculty Grants section. Visit the Teaching and Learning Center if you need help formatting text, images and/or video for your report.

Include the following information:

1. Your name, department, and dates of activities.

2. Brief description of your funded project including activities performed.

3. Some of the insights, accomplishments, and/or benefits you derived from the project.

4. Any challenges you experience during the project or lessons learned that others would benefit from hearing about.

5. Include a few well-chosen photos suitable for posting.

You should also include, but not necessarily for publication:
 
Any other dissemination activities about your project such as interviews, lectures, publications, etc.

Any suggestions, comments or improvements do you have for the Faculty Development Committee.


Complete Writing Guide

Prior to filing receipts and other documents for reimbursement of grant-related expenses, grantees are required to provide a brief, publication-ready report chronicling their grant-funded activities, the benefits they derived professionally from those activities, and the potential value their activities might bring to the larger Otis community.

These reports are easy to write; 1-2 pages are sufficient, and, if possible, 3-5 images help others to quickly understand the nature of your project.  A step-by-step process such as that shown below might help in preparing a written report, ready for web publication:

1. Introduction. A simple statement to the effect of: 

In Fall 2008 I received a Faculty Development Grant in support of equipment needs and travel related to the production of work for an upcoming exhibition at Great Gallery, Kissimmee, FL.

2. Elaboration. A paragraph explaining the grant-funded project or activity, what kinds of needs the grant facilitates, or what special challenges prompted the application, such as: 

Since the work for this exhibition is made entirely of dryer lint, tar, and preserved cow hide, my studio requires retrofitted ventilation and air filtration equipment. In addition to this special equipment need, the exhibition requires three on-site visits, including supervision of the installation, attendance of an opening reception, and presentation of a gallery lecture. 

3. Value to Otis and/or the College Community. A paragraph outlining potential implications this activity might have for the benefit of the grantee, Otis students, faculty, or your department, such as: 

I will share a documentary Powerpoint presentation with my classes in the Foundation, Integrated Learning, and Toy Design programs.  It is hoped that these presentations will enhance student awareness of dryer lint as a construction medium, of tar as a decorative surface enhancing agent, and of preserved cow hide as a collage ground. Further, I plan to share with colleagues in these three programs the process by which I developed this body of work, which can expand their understanding of unique pedagogical, critical, and technical issues embodied by the exhibition.

4. Conclusion/acknowledgment. Finally, a statement of conclusion and/or acknowledgement, such as: 

This project advances my career, and at that same time brings added value to my teaching as I share the work with students and faculty colleagues.  I especially appreciate the opportunity to develop this exhibition with the aid of an Otis Faculty Development Grant; the show would not have been possible without this vital support.  

Such a report, if accompanied by several photographs of the artist's studio—cow hide-covered tables, tar buckets and roofing mops in a row, shiny new fans with hypo-allergenic air filters, and mounds of multi-colored dryer lint—would make a great web page, reflecting the achievements of the faculty member, and Otis' direct support of those achievements and their contribution to the college. 

Your report will also help Otis publicize your work, and at the same time, its commitment to supporting faculty as art/design professionals and as artists/designers who teach.  To view many impressive grantee reports, please see Grantees and Projects Reports.