Events
  • Viet Thanh Nguyen’s bestselling novel The Sympathizer won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, the First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction, and a Carnegie Medal from the American Library Association. It was also a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. Nguyen is also the author of Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America and Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War.

  • Tonya Foster

    Sep 21| Lectures
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    Poet Tonya Foster is the author of the collection A Swarm of Bees in High Court. Her work has appeared in nocturnes, Callaloo, Traffic, Gulf Coast, and other journals. Her essays have appeared in NY Arts Magazine, NYFA Quarterly and The Poetry Project Newsletter. A co-editor of Third Mind: Teaching Creative Writing Through Visual Art, Foster teaches at California College of the Arts and lives in the Bay Area.

  • Steven Ehrlich and Frederick Fisher will present their firms’ collaboration as EHRLICH | FISHER on Otis College’s new Goldsmith Campus Academic Building and Residence Hall. The campus-wide expansion and renovation project includes a new academic building, 300-seat Forum (the venue for this lecture), café and dining commons, Student Life Center, and residence hall.

     

  • Opening Reception

    Sep 24| Special Event
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    New York-based artist Polly Apfelbaum’s work has situated itself as a hybrid of painting, sculpture, and installation over a career spanning 30 plus years. Exploring the intricacies of color, Apfelbaum weaves her way, both literally and conceptually, through ideas of Minimalism, Pop aesthetics, and Color Field painting to blur the lines between two and three dimensional art making.

  • Artist Polly Apfelbaum in conversation with Connie Butler, within Apfelbaum's exhibition Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

     

  • John Keene

    Oct 05| Lectures
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    John Keene is the author of the novels Annotations and Counternarratives, as well as several other works, including the poetry collection Seismosis, with artist Christopher Stackhouse, and a translation of Brazilian author Hilda Hilst's novel Letters from a Seducer. The recipient of a Whiting Award, Keene has been a member of the Dark Room Writers Collective and a Cave Canem fellow. He has served as the managing editor of Callaloo and taught at Northwestern. He currently teaches at Rutgers University-Newark and lives in New York.

  • Artist Polly Apfelbaum in conversation with David Pagel, within Apfelbaum's exhibition Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

     

O-Tube

What To Include In The Grantee Report

Prior to reimbursement for your Faculty Development Grant expenses, please type up a short report about your funded project suitable for posting on this website. For examples of what others have done, see the Faculty Grant Reports section. Visit the Teaching and Learning Center if you need help formatting text, images and/or video for your report.

Include the following information:

  1. Your name, department, and dates of activities.
  2. Brief description of your funded project including activities performed.
  3. Some of the insights, accomplishments, and/or benefits you derived from the project.
  4. Any challenges you experience during the project or lessons learned that others would benefit from hearing about.
  5. Include a few well-chosen photos suitable for posting.

You should also include, but not necessarily for publication:

  • Any other dissemination activities about your project such as interviews, lectures, publications, etc.
  • Any suggestions, comments or improvements do you have for the Faculty Development Committee.
Complete Writing Guide

Prior to filing receipts and other documents for reimbursement of grant-related expenses, grantees are required to provide a brief, publication-ready report chronicling their grant-funded activities, the benefits they derived professionally from those activities, and the potential value their activities might bring to the larger Otis community.

These reports are easy to write; 1-2 pages are sufficient, and, if possible, 3-5 images help others to quickly understand the nature of your project. A step-by-step process such as that shown below might help in preparing a written report, ready for web publication:

1. Introduction. A simple statement to the effect of:

In Fall 2008 I received a Faculty Development Grant in support of equipment needs and travel related to the production of work for an upcoming exhibition at Great Gallery, Kissimmee, FL.

2. Elaboration. A paragraph explaining the grant-funded project or activity, what kinds of needs the grant facilitates, or what special challenges prompted the application, such as:

Since the work for this exhibition is made entirely of dryer lint, tar, and preserved cow hide, my studio requires retrofitted ventilation and air filtration equipment. In addition to this special equipment need, the exhibition requires three on-site visits, including supervision of the installation, attendance of an opening reception, and presentation of a gallery lecture.

3. Value to Otis and/or the College Community. A paragraph outlining potential implications this activity might have for the benefit of the grantee, Otis students, faculty, or your department, such as:

I will share a documentary Powerpoint presentation with my classes in the Foundation, Integrated Learning, and Toy Design programs. It is hoped that these presentations will enhance student awareness of dryer lint as a construction medium, of tar as a decorative surface enhancing agent, and of preserved cow hide as a collage ground. Further, I plan to share with colleagues in these three programs the process by which I developed this body of work, which can expand their understanding of unique pedagogical, critical, and technical issues embodied by the exhibition.

4. Conclusion/acknowledgment. Finally, a statement of conclusion and/or acknowledgement, such as:

This project advances my career, and at that same time brings added value to my teaching as I share the work with students and faculty colleagues. I especially appreciate the opportunity to develop this exhibition with the aid of an Otis Faculty Development Grant; the show would not have been possible without this vital support.

Such a report, if accompanied by several photographs of the artist's studio—cow hide-covered tables, tar buckets and roofing mops in a row, shiny new fans with hypo-allergenic air filters, and mounds of multi-colored dryer lint—would make a great web page, reflecting the achievements of the faculty member, and Otis' direct support of those achievements and their contribution to the college.

Your report will also help Otis publicize your work, and at the same time, its commitment to supporting faculty as art/design professionals and as artists/designers who teach. To view many impressive grantee reports, please see Grantees and Projects Reports.

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