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Architecture / Landscape / Interiors Curriculum

All programs’ curricula are developed in response to Program Learning Outcomes, which signify what students learn within a degree program or emphasis area. All program learning outcomes respond to overarching Institutional Learning Outcomes. View the A/L/I program learning outcomes here

Show All Foundation Course Descriptions
Fall - Foundation (Show All)
Course Course Number Credits
Life Drawing I FNDT180 3
Life Drawing I

Sequenced instruction provides rigorous training in the use of gesture, anatomy, and structural figure drafting. Drawing the human figure from the inside out fosters an understanding of complex visual relationships. Upon completion of the course, students are able to analyze the human form and to view it as a complex perceptual model for the larger realm of visual experience.

Principles of Design FNDT115 2
Principles of Design

This course is a sequenced investigation of various organizing principles using traditional and contemporary media. Students learn fundamentals of value manipulation as determinants of visual order. Elements of visual literacy provide a basis for the study of compositional fundamentals, including focal point(s), directional elements, and visual weight.

Lab fee $30

Drawing and Building Form FNDT160 3
Drawing and Building Form

Students study form in both two-dimensional rendering and three-dimensional building through drawing and building objects. Skills of relational measurement, compositional organization, and the placement of form in space inform both drawing and form-building activities. Drawing techniques such as perspective and isometric projection facilitate successful form generation.

Writing in the Digital Age ENGL107 3
Writing in the Digital Age

Students will explore the ongoing cultural, technological and social changes that impact our ways of reading and writing, and what does it mean to be literate in the digital world. A minimum grade of "C" (2.0) is required to pass this course.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL090 or placement through the Writing Placement Assessment.

Introduction to Visual Culture AHCS120 3
Introduction to Visual Culture

Introduces issues and theories that are critical to the field of Visual Culture and representation in art and design.

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Spring - Foundation (Show All)
Course Course Number Credits
Life Drawing II or
Creative Practices and Responses
FNDT182 or
FNDT171
3
Life Drawing II

Structural drawing and perceptual skills are expanded through study of the figure's relation to environment, life-scale, movement, and draping. Students discover individual sensibilities of mark making and aspects of personal vision, through a variety of traditional and experimental drawing media and techniques.

Prerequisite: FNDT180 Life Drawing I
Recommended for students planning to select Digital Media, Fashion Design or Toy Design as their major.

Creative Practices and Responses

A second-semester Foundation course focused on exploring practices of creativity that bridge art/ design disciplines. Students are exposed to a diverse range of concepts, materials, and methods for working creatively. In class activities promote the documentation of individual creative processes and the synthesis of intuitive, culturally constructed, and personal impulses into inventive visual responses. Recommended for students planning to select Product Design as their major.

Connections through Color and Design CAIL101 3
Connections through Color and Design

A second-semester Creative Action studio course introducing students to contextually-based problem solving using fundamentals of color and design. Students learn Munsell color theory and practical aspects of color mixing such as value, hue and chroma. Students apply these skills in solving problems that engage the larger community, transdisciplinary practice, research, and collaboration.

Drawing Studio or
Form and Space
FNDT192 or
FNDT161
2
Drawing Studio

Students transfer and expand on acquired skills from Drawing and Building Form with the addition of color, problem finding, complexity of idea, and the introduction of Adobe Illustrator as a compositional tool. Acquisition of research skills, an exploration of modern and contemporary notions of cityscape and landscape, and the introduction of more varied drawing media fosters students' realization of aspects of personal vision.

Prerequisite: FNDT160 Drawing and Building Form

Form and Space

Students employ acquired skills transferred from Drawing and Building Form to explore and exploit materials as well as to discover unique processes in creating novel form. The study of three-dimensional design expands to encompass meaning construction, composition and research as students engage the more complex issues of form and space.

Prerequisite: FNDT160 Drawing and Building Form
Recommended for students planning to select A/L/I, Fashion Design or Product Design as their major.

Elective FNDT145 1
Elective

Foundation year students can pick any Foundation Elective to fulfil this requirement. See the department or the Course Catalog for more information.

Birth of the Modern AHCS121 3
Birth of the Modern

Explores the key issues, problems, and events in art, history, music, literature, science, and design associated with and resulting from the social and cultural changes that occurred in the modern world.

Ways of Knowing LIBS114 3
Ways of Knowing

An interdisciplinary theme/issue driven project based course for first year students. This course will be paired with another course in a different discipline that is exploring a similar issue/theme. See Department for course offerings.

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Show All Sophomore Year Course Descriptions
Fall - Sophomore (Show All)
Course Course Number Credits
Studio I: Scale, Structure and Space ARLI250 4
Studio I: Scale, Structure and Space

Formal design strategies, three-dimensional modeling in varied physical media, and the graphic tools and language of spatial design are introduced and practiced. Field conditions, movement, and events are emphasized through projects progressing from abstract compositions to a minimal program of inhabitation.

Technologies + Ecologies I: Landscape Technology and Ecology ARLI260 3
Technologies + Ecologies I: Landscape Technology and Ecology

The materiality, shaping, and construction of landscape is studied through natural processes, grading, site engineering and construction, planting, and water management.

Digital Media I: Communicating Information ARLI270 2
Digital Media I: Communicating Information

Software programs incorporating type, color, line, and image manipulation are introduced and practiced through digitally generated two- dimensional compositions. Methods of technique, composition, perception, and critical evaluation are introduced and practiced.

Digital Media II-A: Digital Translations ARLI271 2
Digital Media II-A: Digital Translations

Computer-aided drafting (CAD) is introduced and practiced through the production of presentation quality drawings of Studio I projects.

Co-requisite: ARLI250 Studio I

History + Theory I: Prehistory to Industrial Era CRIT205 3
History + Theory I: Prehistory to Industrial Era

The manifestation of cultural, political, religious, and economic forces affecting architecture, landscapes, and interiors from prehistory to the advent of the industrial era is surveyed

Required for Architecture/Landscape/Interiors majors.

Creative Action Lecture * CAIL200 3
Creative Action Lecture
Creative Action Liberal Arts electives enable students to work in transdisciplinary teams with a community partner. Emphasizing collaborative methodology, synthesizing diverse perspectives, creativity, critical thinking, clear communication, and information literacy, students engage in issues that extend beyond the traditional classroom. See department for course offerings.
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Spring - Sophomore (Show All)
Course Course Number Credits
Studio II: Landscape ARLI252 4
Studio II: Landscape

Design theory, process, and landscape technologies are applied to the problem of public parks and/or gardens.

Prerequisites: ARLI250 Studio I, ARLI260 Technologies + Ecologies I, ARLI271 Digital Media II-A

Technologies + Ecologies II: Interior Technology ARLI261 3
Technologies + Ecologies II: Interior Technology

Sources, materials, methods, detailing, fabrication, and documentation of “nonstructural” building components—building finishes, architectural woodwork and cabinetry, interior finishes, and FF&E—are studied through lectures, readings, field trips, and projects.

Prerequisite: ARLI250 Studio I

Digital Media II-B: Digital Modeling, Rendering, and Fabrication ARLI273 3
Digital Media II-B: Digital Modeling, Rendering, and Fabrication

Digital modeling, rendering, and fabrication techniques are introduced and practiced.

Prerequisite: ARLI271 Digital Media II-A. Co-requisite: ARLI252 Studio II

History + Theory II: Industrial Era to the Present CRIT206 3
History + Theory II: Industrial Era to the Present

The manifestation of cultural, political, religious, and economic forces affecting architecture, landscapes, and interiors from the industrial era to the present is surveyed.

Required for Architecture/Landscape/Interiors majors.

LAS Sophomore Elective * LIBS214 3
LAS Sophomore Elective

More than one course may be available, see the Course Catalog and consult the department and/or your advisor for more information.

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Show All Junior Course Descriptions
Fall - Junior (Show All)
Course Course Number Credits
Studio III: Interiors ARLI352 4
Studio III: Interiors

Design theory, process, and interior technologies are applied to projects that address nonresidential interiors, such as restaurants, stores, spas, exhibits, entertainment and meeting venues, etc.

Prerequisites: ARLI250 Studio I, ARLI261 Technologies + Ecologies II, ARLI271 Digital Media II-A

Technologies + Ecologies III: Architecture Technology ARLI360 3
Technologies + Ecologies III: Architecture Technology

The materials and methods of building construction are studied. Basic structural principles are presented through an introduction to forces and resultants in beams and columns.

Prerequisite: ARLI250 Studio I

Planning to Plan ARLI363 2
Planning to Plan

Space planning conventions, with an emphasis on access and circulation, are introduced, practiced, and modified. Resultant effects on use and lifestyle are discussed through precedents as well as the students’ projects.

Prerequisite: ARLI 250 Studio I

Social Science * SSCI210 3
Social Science

More than one course may be available, see the Course Catalog and consult the department and/or your advisor for more information.

Applied Trigonometry MATH246 3
Applied Trigonometry

Covers topics in analytical geometry and trigonometry. There is an emphasis on algebraic manipulation and on applications of the topics covered to the design field.

Required for Architecture/Landscape/Interiors majors.

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Spring - Junior (Show All)
Course Course Number Credits
Studio IV: Interior Architecture ARLI353 5
Studio IV: Interior Architecture

Design theory, process, building, and interior technologies are applied to the problem of a residential program sited within an existing building.

Prerequisites: ARLI352 Studio III, ARLI360 Technologies + Ecologies III

Creative Action Studio CAIL300 2
Creative Action Studio

An upper-division interdisciplinary studio course offering unique core content that shifts from term to term. This studio affords students the opportunity to engage with professionals from various fields and expand their notion of problem solving beyond their major in public site real world challenges.

A limited choice of CAIL300 courses will count for the Sustainability Minor.
Please see the Interdisciplinary Studies Director.

History + Theory III: Contemporary Theories and Practices in Architecture CRIT304 2
History + Theory III: Contemporary Theories and Practices in Architecture

A diversity of critical and generative approaches to twentieth and twenty - first century design is situated historically, while introducing current themes and debates in contemporary architectural practice a nd related disciplines.

Prerequisite: CRIT205 History + Theory I or CRIT206 History + Theory II. Required for Architecture/Landscape/Interiors majors.

Natural Science * NSCI307 3
Natural Science

More than one course may be available, see the Course Catalog and consult the department and/or your advisor for more information.

LAS Upper Division Elective * LIBS314 3
LAS Upper Division Elective

This course can be an upper division Art History or upper division Liberal Studies elective. See the Course Catalog (pdf) for examples of upper division elective offerings or see the Department and/or your Adviser for more information.

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Show All Senior Course Descriptions
Fall - Senior (Show All)
Course Course Number Credits
Studio V: Architecture ARLI454 5
Studio V: Architecture

Design theory, process, and building technologies are applied to the problem of a building within an urban context.

Prerequisite: ARLI353 Studio IV

Lighting Fundamentals ARLI362 2
Lighting Fundamentals

The basic design and technical requirements of lighting systems are introduced with an emphasis on commercial and entertainment applications.

Prerequisite: ARLI250 Studio I, or equivalent.

Fabrications S ARLI475 2
Fabrications S

Orthographic representation, the basic and safe operations of wood shop tools, and methods of wood joinery and detailing are introduced and practiced through projects addressing the housing and display of small objects.

Prerequisite: ARLI 250 Studio I, or equivalent

History + Theory IV: Corporate and Consumer Environments CRIT405 2
History + Theory IV: Corporate and Consumer Environments

Interior organizations are examined through spaces of work and consumption, ergonomics, office landscaping, corporate parks, brandscapes, junk space, malls, themed environments, surveillance, and spectacle.

Prerequisite: CRIT304 History + Theory III.
Required for Architecture/Landsc ape/Interiors majors.

Capstone LIBS440 3
Capstone

A required senior- level course where students identify and critically reflect on a theme that intersects with their own studio practice, discipline, and/or identity and their work in Liberal Studies. The Capstone is the signature course and culminating expression of the Liberal Arts program.

A minimum grade of “C-" or better is required to pass this course.

Note that Creative Writing, Art History, Cultural Studies, Sustainability minors, and Fine Arts majors take specific Capstones. Please see department for courses.

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Spring - Senior (Show All)
Course Course Number Credits
Studio VI: Architecture and Landscape ARLI455 5
Studio VI: Architecture and Landscape

Design theory, process, architecture, and landscape technologies are applied to the problem of a building, or buildings, integrated with landscape.

Prerequisite: ARLI454 Studio V, ARLI 260 Technologies + Ecologies I

Interior Development ARLI460 2
Interior Development

An interior space, including all finishes, lighting, furniture and integrated custom components, is designed, developed, and represented in orthographic drawings and rendered views.

Prerequisite: ARLI352 Studio III

Constructions ARLI461 3
Constructions

An interior or exterior environment is designed, documented, and constructed.

Prerequisite: ARLI454 Studio V

Presentation Techniques ARLI465 2
Presentation Techniques

Comprehensive presentations of selected studio projects are designed and produced for display and/or public presentation.

Co-requisite: ARLI461Constructions

History + Theory V: Landscape Theory and Practice CRIT406 2
History + Theory V: Landscape Theory and Practice

Landscape as a system of representation and performance is studied through the tradition of formal and picturesque gardens, the discourses of the beautiful and sublime, urban parks, the integration of modernism and landscape, earth art, everyday and extreme landscapes, industrial and natural ecologies, and landscape urbanism.

Prerequisite: CRIT304 History + Theory III. Required for Architecture/Landscape/Interiors majors.

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*These courses may be taken in either the fall or spring semester.

Courses in gray are Liberal Arts and Sciences courses.


The curriculum displayed is meant to provide an overview of the current semester’s offerings in this department; it does not represent all degree requirements for the Major or Area of Emphasis. These can be found in each student’s Course Catalog (identified by the year in which one would have entered the college as a Foundation student), which can be found here. If you have questions regarding your specific curricular requirements and/or Course Catalog, please contact Academic Advisement Coordinator Carrie Malcom at cmalcom@otis.edu or (310) 846-2550.