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MFA Writing Curriculum

Full-Time Schedule    |    Part-Time Schedule

All programs’ curricula are developed in response to Program Learning Outcomes, which signify what students learn within a degree program or emphasis area. All program learning outcomes respond to overarching Institutional Learning Outcomes. View the MFA Writing Curriculum program learning outcomes here

 

 


Show All First Year Course Descriptions
Fall - First Year (Show All)
Course Course Number Credits
Writing Workshop I WRIT602 4
Writing Workshop I

A two-year, team-taught, multi-genre workshop sequence in which students may submit manuscripts in any area of interest (fiction, poetry, non-fiction, etc.) for critique. This course may be repeated for credit.

Tutorial: The Writing Life I WRIT610 3
Tutorial: The Writing Life I

Each graduate student will be paired with a Graduate Writing faculty member who is a practitioner in the student’s area of greatest interest. The student and Faculty member will meet one-on-one four to five times during the semester to review student work and discuss related directed reading, and for counseling in the practice of writing, which may include everything from manuscript submission and querying agents to a broader discussion of how the student will be able to sustain an active post-degree writing life. This course may be repeated for credit.

Writing Colloquium or
Literary Seminar
WRIT730 or
WRIT750
3
Writing Colloquium

A team-taught multi-genre reading seminar developed through a series of Faculty-student conversations in the previous semester that will focus on a literary and-or cultural topic or topics of common interest. While the Faculty will ultimately determine the reading list, the students will help give shape to the course. This course may be repeated for credit.

Literary Seminar

These in-depth seminars focus on particular issues or currents in contemporary fiction and poetry, with topics selected from various international literary traditions (e.g., “Poetry’s Public” or “The Ethics of Fiction”) or monographic courses on such figures as Gertrude Stein, William Faulkner, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, or Eudora Welty. This course may be repeated for credit.

Visiting Writers Series WRIT789 1
Visiting Writers Series

A series of talks, 7- 8 per semester, featuring visiting poets, fiction writers and essayists from the U.S. and abroad who read and discuss their own work and aspects of contemporary literary culture. A question and answer period follows each talk.

This course may be repeated for credit.

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Spring - First Year (Show All)
Course Course Number Credits
Writing Workshop I WRIT602 4
Writing Workshop I

A two-year, team-taught, multi-genre workshop sequence in which students may submit manuscripts in any area of interest (fiction, poetry, non-fiction, etc.) for critique. This course may be repeated for credit.

Tutorial: The Writing Life I WRIT610 3
Tutorial: The Writing Life I

Each graduate student will be paired with a Graduate Writing faculty member who is a practitioner in the student’s area of greatest interest. The student and Faculty member will meet one-on-one four to five times during the semester to review student work and discuss related directed reading, and for counseling in the practice of writing, which may include everything from manuscript submission and querying agents to a broader discussion of how the student will be able to sustain an active post-degree writing life. This course may be repeated for credit.

Writing Colloquium or
Literary Seminar
WRIT730 or
WRIT750
3
Writing Colloquium

A team-taught multi-genre reading seminar developed through a series of Faculty-student conversations in the previous semester that will focus on a literary and-or cultural topic or topics of common interest. While the Faculty will ultimately determine the reading list, the students will help give shape to the course. This course may be repeated for credit.

Literary Seminar

These in-depth seminars focus on particular issues or currents in contemporary fiction and poetry, with topics selected from various international literary traditions (e.g., “Poetry’s Public” or “The Ethics of Fiction”) or monographic courses on such figures as Gertrude Stein, William Faulkner, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, or Eudora Welty. This course may be repeated for credit.

Visiting Writers Series WRIT789 1
Visiting Writers Series

A series of talks, 7- 8 per semester, featuring visiting poets, fiction writers and essayists from the U.S. and abroad who read and discuss their own work and aspects of contemporary literary culture. A question and answer period follows each talk.

This course may be repeated for credit.

  11

Show All Second Year Course Descriptions
Fall - Second Year (Show All)
Course Course Number Credits
Writing Workshop II WRIT702 4
Writing Workshop II

A two-year, team-taught, multi-genre workshop sequence in which students may submit manuscripts in any area of interest (fiction, poetry, non-fiction, etc.) for critique. This course may be repeated for credit.

Tutorial: The Writing Life II WRIT710 3
Tutorial: The Writing Life II

Each graduate student will be paired with a Graduate Writing faculty member who is a practitioner in the student’s area of greatest interest. The student and Faculty member will meet one-on-one four to five times during the semester to review student work and discuss related directed reading, and for counseling in the practice of writing, which may include everything from manuscript submission and querying agents to a broader discussion of how the student will be able to sustain an active post-degree writing life. This course may be repeated for credit.

Writing Colloquium or
Literary Seminar
WRIT730 or
WRIT750
3
Writing Colloquium

A team-taught multi-genre reading seminar developed through a series of Faculty-student conversations in the previous semester that will focus on a literary and-or cultural topic or topics of common interest. While the Faculty will ultimately determine the reading list, the students will help give shape to the course. This course may be repeated for credit.

Literary Seminar

These in-depth seminars focus on particular issues or currents in contemporary fiction and poetry, with topics selected from various international literary traditions (e.g., “Poetry’s Public” or “The Ethics of Fiction”) or monographic courses on such figures as Gertrude Stein, William Faulkner, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, or Eudora Welty. This course may be repeated for credit.

Visiting Writers Series WRIT789 1
Visiting Writers Series

A series of talks, 7- 8 per semester, featuring visiting poets, fiction writers and essayists from the U.S. and abroad who read and discuss their own work and aspects of contemporary literary culture. A question and answer period follows each talk.

This course may be repeated for credit.

  11
Spring - Second Year (Show All)
Course Course Number Credits
Writing Workshop II WRIT702 4
Writing Workshop II

A two-year, team-taught, multi-genre workshop sequence in which students may submit manuscripts in any area of interest (fiction, poetry, non-fiction, etc.) for critique. This course may be repeated for credit.

Tutorial: The Writing Life II WRIT710 3
Tutorial: The Writing Life II

Each graduate student will be paired with a Graduate Writing faculty member who is a practitioner in the student’s area of greatest interest. The student and Faculty member will meet one-on-one four to five times during the semester to review student work and discuss related directed reading, and for counseling in the practice of writing, which may include everything from manuscript submission and querying agents to a broader discussion of how the student will be able to sustain an active post-degree writing life. This course may be repeated for credit.

Writing Colloquium or
Literary Seminar
WRIT730 or
WRIT750
3
Writing Colloquium

A team-taught multi-genre reading seminar developed through a series of Faculty-student conversations in the previous semester that will focus on a literary and-or cultural topic or topics of common interest. While the Faculty will ultimately determine the reading list, the students will help give shape to the course. This course may be repeated for credit.

Literary Seminar

These in-depth seminars focus on particular issues or currents in contemporary fiction and poetry, with topics selected from various international literary traditions (e.g., “Poetry’s Public” or “The Ethics of Fiction”) or monographic courses on such figures as Gertrude Stein, William Faulkner, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, or Eudora Welty. This course may be repeated for credit.

Visiting Writers Series WRIT789 1
Visiting Writers Series

A series of talks, 7- 8 per semester, featuring visiting poets, fiction writers and essayists from the U.S. and abroad who read and discuss their own work and aspects of contemporary literary culture. A question and answer period follows each talk.

This course may be repeated for credit.

Thesis WRIT790 4
Thesis

A sample of a book-length, publishable project of prose or poetry supervised by the department chair and faculty. The work (100 pgs. of prose, 40 pgs. of poetry) will be submitted to a faculty committee for final approval.

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The curriculum displayed is meant to provide an overview of the current semester’s offerings in this department; it does not represent all degree requirements for the Major or Area of Emphasis. These can be found in each student’s Course Catalog (identified by the year in which one would have entered the college as a Foundation student), which can be found here. If you have questions regarding your specific curricular requirements and/or Course Catalog, please contact Academic Advisement Coordinator Carrie Malcom at cmalcom@otis.edu or (310) 846-2550.