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New York Times: Building Coachella’s Giant Art

Over the weekend, there’s a good chance your social media feeds were flooded with photos and video from Coachella.

Over the past two decades, the music festival has become a kind of unavoidable cultural juggernaut, famously spawning not just scores of imitators, but also an entire season on the fashion calendar. 

Artforum Critic's Pick: Kenzi Shiokava

Most of Kenzi Shiokava’s sculptures consist of organic matter, like bark and dragon-tree fronds, combined with found materials, such as chicken wire or brooms. In Untitled (Urban Totem Series), 2000, an upright railroad tie narrows into two sharp prongs at the top. Of a similar shape, Untitled (Urban Totem Series), 2005, was carved from a discarded telephone pole. Each sculpture resembles a statuesque humanoid form.

Los Angeles Times: Judithe Hernández’s ('74) Latest Exhibition

Lotería is to the pastel drawings of Judithe Hernández ('74) what the I Ching was to John Cage’s avant-garde music after World War II or the “Three Standard Stoppages” were to the Dada objects of Marcel Duchamp a century ago.

Hyperallergic: “I Wanted to Make Art that Told a Story”: Alison Saar on Her Eloquent Sculptures

LOS ANGELES — The artist Alison Saar set a goal for herself long ago: to clearly communicate her ideas and emotions through the power of form. Her sculptures have their own personal vocabulary that speaks in a direct language about history, race, and mythology. If her sculptures are the melodies that capture one’s soul, the narratives behind them are the lyrics.

Blouin Artinfo: Alison Saar’s ‘Topsy Turvy’ at L.A. Louver, Los Angeles

L.A. Louver is hosting Alison Saar’s "Topsy Turvy” at its Los Angeles venue.

An exhibition of new works by the Los Angeles-based artist takes inspiration from the character of Topsy in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s classic Civil War-era novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” Saar re-contextualizes the sprightly uncouth slave girl as a symbol of defiance, through paintings on dyed vintage linens and sculptures carved from wood.

V Magazine: The New Vision, Kelly Akashi

With genre-bending bodies of work that span a range of mediums and materials, these are the names to know in today’s evolving scene. First up is sculptor Kelly Akashi (BFA Fine Arts '06). 

Widewalls: Learning to Read with John Baldessari

For half a decade, John Baldessari ('58) combined image and language in a varied practice that included photo collages, sculptures, and videos, at the same time investigating how art itself is made and understood.

Known for his approach of good-humored irreverence, he punctuated his work with visual puns, wordplay, instructions and quotations, touching upon deeper truths regarding how we communicate through culture, and how art might reinvent itself.

Alumnus Chris Oatey Reviewed in LA Times

Ideas around chance -- which Merriam-Webster defines as “something that happens unpredictably without discernible human intention or observable cause” -- have driven a lot of art in the past century. Denver-based Conceptual artist Chris Oatey ('06 MFA Fine Arts) joins the crowd in nine recent pairs of paintings and drawings at CB1 Gallery.

ALUMNUS KERRY JAMES MARSHALL SET FOR MAJOR THREE-CITY RETROSPECTIVE

In many ways, Chicago-based artist Kerry James Marshall ('78 Fine Arts) has depicted the African American experience on canvas much as playwright August Wilson chronicled it for the theater. And beginning this spring, Marshall’s work will be seen in its first retrospective exhibition, “KJM: Mastry,” which will open at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago (April 23 – Sept. 25, 2016), move on to New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art (Oct. 25, 2016 – Jan. 29, 2017), and finally be on display at the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles (March 21 – July 2, 2017).

Alumna Kelly Akashi Exhibiting in Made in L.A. 2016 at the Hammer Museum

Alumna Kelly Akashi ('06 BFA) has been named as one of 26 artists that will be exhibiting in the Hammer Museum’s biennial in June. Akashi, a Los Angeles native, uses everything from blown glass, handmade candles, bronze, and painted wood in her works which have been exhibited at the