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Events
  • Otis Family Night

    Feb 27| Special Event
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    FRIDAY, FEBRUARY, 27TH

    4:00 – 8:30 PM

    • Hands-on studio workshops taught by Otis faculty
    • A guided exhibition tour in the Ben Maltz Gallery
    • Info session about travel study to Brazil, Japan, London, and beyond
    • A presentation about the student internship/job search process  

  • Ghost particles / THESIS EXHIBITION 



    Exhibition, March 3 - 7, 2015 

    Reception, Thursday March 5, 6:00 - 9:00pm
 

    
Map of Location

     

  • Charlie White

    Mar 03| Lectures
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    Charlie White is a photographer and filmmaker whose work has been exhibited internationally since 1999. White holds the position of Associate Professor at the University of Southern California’s Roski School of Fine Arts.
     
  • Torbjørn Rødland is a Los Angeles-based photographer known for portraits, still lives and landscapes that transcend their often banal settings and motifs and move into the otherworldly. Since the late 1990s, his work has been exhibited widely.

     

    Image: Torbjørn-Rødland-courtesy-MACK-www.mackbooks.co.uk

     

    rodland.tumblr.com/

  • Composer Kubilay Üner offers a “reactive” experience with a live presentation of a new composition made in response to the exhibition Angie Bray: Shhhh. The performance will be interspersed with conversation between Üner and Bray.

  • Kathryn Andrews gets some of her best ideas driving around Los Angeles, where the visual contradictions she sees every day find their way into her art. Andrews, who is originally from Mobile, Alabama, is known for the commonplace objects she fabricates from highly polished and painted metal, into which she incorporates inexpensive or borrowed finds, including rented Hollywood props.

  •  

    Los Angeles Premiere Screening of 

    The State of Creativity

    A Look into the Otis Report on the Creative Economy

    Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the formation of a media partnership with KCETLink. The partnership will bring the 2014 Otis Report on the Creative Economy of the Los Angeles Region and the State of California into the digital age through an interactive, multi-platform presentation developed by, and for, KCETLink’s award-winning arts and culture series, Artbound.

O-Tube

Norman Zammitt

Norman ZammittNorman ZammittNorman Zammitt

 

Norman Zammitt was (1931-2007) raised on the Mohawk [Caughnawaga Indian] reservation near Montreal. After serving in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, he returned to America, graduated from Pasadena City College in 1957, and earned his MFA ('61) from Otis in 1961. He taught art at California Institute of the Arts, USC, and UCLA during his long career as an artist.

His often mural-sized works can now be found in private collections as well as at the Museum of Modern Art, the Hirschhorn Collection, and the Corcoran Gallery. His straight-edge style suggested mathematics and engineering, some reviewers observed; others posited that the ethereal element in his art seemed to rise up out of the geometry by intention. Often his work was said to create a “meditative mood.”

“Zammitt crafted meticulous bands of color in subtle gradations and shades in his paintings,” noted the Los Angeles Times. “Many of them evoke sunsets, deserts and other scenes in nature. And according to Carol Eliel, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, “[Zammitt] translated the light and landscape of California to paint. He wanted to include the more spiritual aspects of the California landscape in his work.”

Still, Eliel notes that Zammitt’s art didn’t fit neatly into a single school or movement, though his interest in capturing light and space related his work to that of such artists as Larry Bell and Robert Irwin (’50). At the same time, his precision and a preference for sleek surfaces related his creations to the art of Billy Al Bengston (‘57), among other Otis-trained California artists who rose to prominence in the 1970s.

Of his art, Zammitt once wrote to an Otis colleague: “The artist’s first responsibility is to his own truth. For me, art is a responsibility to myself, to my own sincere thoughts. To keep in contact with that is a constant struggle. […] To recreate an old form or create a new form is not necessarily the most important concern. Form should be a result, a sincere statement of integrity; form happens as part of a desire to make a statement straight from the heart. Form seems to always be there, and the need to express it becomes stronger and stronger. Each expression does not slowly exhaust the source, but on the contrary, the artist cannot keep up with what he has to say. […] For me, this has become a way of life. I never planned it to be this way, but I am glad about it. Nothing else makes me feel more right, more my own self.”

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