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Events
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • Exquisite Beauty is the first retrospective and publication to document the eye-dazzling ceramics created by Ralph Bacerra (1938–2008), a Los Angeles–based artist known for his innovative approach to surface embellishment. Curated by Jo Lauria, the exhibition features more than ninety of the artist’s finest pieces—dramatic, highly decorated vessels and sculptures that have never before been the focus of a major exhibition or publication.

  • Opening Reception for Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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Patssi Valdez

Patssi ValdezPatssi ValdezPatssi ValdezPatssi Valdez

 

Patssi Valdez ('85), recipient of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Latina of Excellence Award, Flintridge fellowship, Durfee Foundation Grant, a J. Paul Getty Fellowship Grant, and an NEA in painting, has remained particularly active in the West Coast art scene.

Her work is a part of the traveling exhibition Chicano Visions: American Painters on the Verge, curated by Cheech Marin, touring through 2008. Venues for that exhibition include the Smithsonian Institution, the De Young Fine Arts Museum (San Francisco), and LACMA.

Growing up in East Los Angeles, she became the only female among the seminal, four-member Chicano art group ASCO ("nausea" in Spanish). ASCO's members included the well-known photographer Harry Gamboa and artists Willie Herron and Gronk. ASCO expanded the definition of Chicano art beyond murals and posters by experimenting with a range of art forms, including street performance, photographic montage, pageantry, and conceptual art.

Valdez' work speaks volumes not just in her use of spectacular color, but by the intentional omissions in her paintings, such as a dressing table strewn with souvenirs (and just Valdez's mirrored reflection).

Says writer Rita Gonzalez, "It is everyday and domestic life, with its textures and subtly shifting ambiences that has continued as a constant in Valdez' work."

Valdez is represented by the Patricia Correia Gallery (Santa Monica) and Carlotta's Passion (Eagle Rock) and exhibited at the San Jose Art Museum. A traveling fifty-piece survey of her work took place at the Mexican Museum (San Francisco) and the Laguna Art Museum (Laguna Beach).

Since the mid-1990s, she has been an art consultant for such films as La Familia (1995) and Production Designer for Luminaries (1998).