• Todd Gray

    Oct 25| Lectures

    Todd Gray was born in 1954 in Los Angeles. Gray received an MFA and a BFA from California Institute of the Arts and is currently a professor at California State University, Long Beach. He has shown performance work at REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney CalArts Theater), Los Angeles (2010); California African American Museum, Los Angeles (2009); the Commons, New York University (2008); 18th Street Arts Center, Santa Monica (2008); New Renaissance Theater, Syracuse, NY (2007); and Academy of Media Arts, Cologne (2004).

  • Ruby Neri is a sculptor, painter, and former street artist from San Francisco and Los Angeles, California, known for her evocative portrayal of horses.

  • Otis in NYC
    October 27, 2016 
    6 - 8 pm 
    Franklin Parrasch Gallery
    53 East 64 Street
    New York, NY 10065

    Otis College President Bruce W. Ferguson is coming to NYC! 
    Please come say hello and visit with your fellow alumni and friends of Otis College of Art and Design.
    Drinks and hors d'oeuvres.


  • Lecture takes place at 356 S. Mission Rd., co-presented with Ben Maltz Gallery in conjunction with the exhibition Polly Apfelbaum: Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

    New York-based critic and independent curator Bob Nickas presents his musings on one hundred paintings, choosing one from each year from 1915-2015.

  • Bob Nickas

    Oct 31| Lectures

    Bob Nickas is a critic and independent curator based in New York, having organized more than ninety exhibitions since 1984.
    He was Curatorial Advisor at P.S.1/MoMA in New York between 2004-07, where his exhibitions include: 
    Lee Lozano: Drawn From Life; 
    William Gedney—Christopher Wool: Into the Night; 
    Stephen Shore: American Surfaces; 
    Wolfgang Tillmans: Freedom From The Known. 

  • Looking at the recent works of Sebastian Stumpf one finds an interplay between performance and the recording of performance, between the execution of a physical act and the documentation of it by means of a camera. [He] operates in two distinct realms: in the empty spaces of contemporary art institutions and in urban settings with their preexisting orders. […] An inconspicuous architectural detail suddenly becomes the catalyst for a physical exploit…. The art gallery becomes a space for action.

  • Passionate Voices Expressed in Sound Bearing Plastic: An Evening with Collector Richard Shelton



Hyperallergic on the Legacy and Revival of Ceramics

PARIS — Conversations about art and medium-specificity are almost always conversations about history. Yet in our postmodern, post-media times we have tended to shy away from the Greenbergian concept of medium-specificity as a particularly relevant principle for organizing historical exhibitions. Partially defying this trend, curators Camille Morineau and Lucia Pesapane give us Ceramix, a sweeping, historical, ceramic-specific survey of the 20th and 21st centuries, with some earlier works mixed in for context.

Fine Arts Alumnus Eduardo Sarabia Awarded Mike Kelley Foundation Grant

Launched in June of last year, the Artist Project Grants seek to further Mike Kelley’s philanthropic work and honour his legacy by supporting innovative projects with visual artists at L.A. non-profit institutions and organisations. The goal is to benefit both visual artists and arts organizations alike and to support compelling and inventive projects in any medium, particularly work that is under-known, or has proven difficult to make or to fund.

Alumna Keiko Fukazawa exhibit Made in China Reviewed by LA Times

Keiko Fukazawa's ('86 MFA Ceramics) "Spout Monster #1" is an unassuming little smart bomb, a precision-guided work of art that explodes aesthetic conventions by uncovering buried social and political content in ordinary found objects.

The porcelain sculpture, included in the modest but captivating survey of Fukazawa's recent ceramics newly opened at the Craft and Folk Art Museum, is composed from two shallow, footed bowls. They are stacked rim to rim and fused together in the kiln, looking like a little flying saucer.

Alumnus Diego Romero Awarded United States Artists Fellowship

Firmly positioning his work within an Indigenous visuality, Diego Romero has built a career constructing ceramic vessels that elevate Pueblo life to Olympian stature. A third generation professional artist, Romero was born and raised in Berkeley, California to a Cochiti father and a non-Native mother.

Los Angeles Times Features 'Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty'

Somewhere ceramist Ralph Bacerra is smiling, says Jo Lauria, curator of "Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty" at the Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis College of Art and Design in L.A.

Alumnus Paul Soldner

"As an artist, I work with clay, bronze, photos and prints. From these mediums, I make objects for use. But their uses are varied. Some are functional, some are not. They are meant to sometimes surprise. Disgust or delight. Although made to be used. Use not be common. In its highest sense, such use is in the spirit. Of celebration. Of life. Enhanced.

ArtScene Reviews AMOCA'S 10th Anniversary Exhibition, Curated By Faculty Jo Lauria

ArtScene, June 2015 Publication
By Scarlet Cheng

Los Angeles Modern Auctions Features Otis College and the Ceramic Revolution

Peter’s Auction Pick of the Day: Otis College and the Ceramic Revolution

The Los Angeles County Art Institute, which became the Otis College of Art and Design, was at the center of ceramic’s evolution as an artistic medium in America. In 1954 Peter Voulkos became head of its ceramics department. He brought with him energy, strength and a bold streak influenced by Abstract Expressionism–all new elements for the discipline.

The Marks Project: Joan Takayama-Ogawa

Joan Takayama-Ogawa

Product Design Faculty Joan Takayama-Ogawa has been identified by The Marks Project as one of the top 50 American Ceramic Artists, which requires Joan to document the artist signature throughout her career for future authentication.