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  • Silke Otto-Knapp is a painter and associate professor of painting and drawing at UCLA. 
     
    She has had recent one-person exhibitions at Overduin and Kite, Los Angeles; Galerie Buchholz, Berlin; the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive; Greengrassi, London; Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London; Kunstverein Munich, Germany; Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, New York; the Banff Centre, Canada; Modern Art Oxford, UK; and Tate Britain, London.
     
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  • Sergej Jensen

    Mar 31| Lectures
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    Sergej Jensen’s work draws on a wide range of materials and formal references. Primarily known for his textile works, his lyrical compositions incorporate a variety of fabrics, from burlap and linen to silk and wool.
     
    He recently exhibited his work in the show "Classic" at Regen Projects, and his work is also included in LACMA's show "Variations: Conversations in and around Abstract Painting.”
  • Otis College of Art and Design Fine Arts Department presents the film collaborative from Berlin OJOBOCA.

     

    Thursday April 2nd, 2015
    7pm in Ahmanson Hall, lower-level screening room.
    9045 Lincoln Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90045

     

  • Rea Tajiri

    Apr 07| Lectures
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    Rea Tajiri is a New York based filmmaker and educator who has written and directed an eclectic body of dramatic, experimental, and documentary films currently in commercial and educational distribution. She is also an Associate Professor at Temple University in the Film Media Arts Department.
     
    Learn more about the artist here.
     
  • Dusk to Dusk

    Apr 11| Exhibition
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    James Aldridge, The Gathering, 2010, Acrylic on canvas


    Dusk to Dusk: Unsettled, Unraveled, Unreal

    April 11 - July 26, 2015  |  Gallery Hours: Tue-Fri 10-5 / Thu 10-7 / Sat-Sun 12-4

  • Come fly a kite!

    Bring your family and friends to make and fly kites at the beach.

    Everyone will receive his or her own free, unique kite along with color theory instruction. Otis students will provide advice.

    Where

    Just north of the Santa Monica Pier
    Parking at the North Parking Lot 1: $12

    When

    Saturday, April 11, 2015, 10 am – 4 pm

O-Tube

I Search Paper for Sophomore IL

What is an I-Search Paper?

 

An I-Search Paper helps you learn the nature of searching and discovery on a chosen topic. Your goal is to pay attention, track this exploration, and LEARN HOW YOU LEARN. The I-Search Paper should be the story of your search process, including chronological reflections on the phases of research in a narrative form. The I is for YOU. It's the story of YOUR search and what you learned.

 

Steps

The  I-Search paper is NOT a standard research paper. Instead, what you are expected to do is:

  1. Write down a statement about the focus of your research and what you hope to find. Say why you chose the topic and what questions you want to answer. 
  2. Remember, you are not looking for “the answer.” You are not writing a report. You are investigating a topic in an attempt to learn something new about where and how it is discussed in print and other media. In fact, given the personal nature of this paper, your conclusion might offer reflections on what you learned about the topic and about researching.
  3. Record and describe the chronological step-by-step PROCESS of searching for information. Write in FIRST PERSON (I, me, my). A journal or notebook would be a good method to use. 
  4. Include the actual search terms you used and how you modified them as you went along. (See Beginning Your Research).
  5. Say which specific databases and search engines you tried. Analyze the results. How many hits did you get? Say how and why you modified your search strategy to get more or less. What did you learn about each database that you tried?
  6. For issue-oriented research, Opposing Viewpoints is your best choice.
  7. If you have trouble finding relevant articles or books in the Library, ask a librarian. They have Master's Degrees in research, are more discerning than search engines, and are happy to assist!
  8. Include actual facts and theories that you discovered about your topic as well as idiosyncratic information such as what surprised you. You could say what you already knew about the topic before beginning the research and how that topic may have changed during the research process.
  9. Create a bibliography of at least 3-5 resources which MUST be found through the Otis databases, including the OPAC, and include journal articles and/or books. You should also include websites if you used them, but those will be in addition to the 3-5. You must annotate and evaluate, including the identify the credentials of the author and the type of information (scholarly, popular, etc.)/intented autience. (See Sample Annotations, CRAAP Detection  and Types of Information.
  10. Remember that research is a creative process. Use your creative thinking skills in the research process. Explore widely, question,  and keep  revising your strategy as you go along seeking information about your topic.