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Events
  • Join us for the ultimate genre mash up as we drop the best hip hop and underground hiphop from all over as well as some of the freshest hard hitting electronic music out today. Presented by DJ Chewby (Pamela Torzan), DJ Snowden (Ryan Snowden) Daybid 1X (David Namkoong), and 90’s Kid (Danial Siddiqui) of the Otis Radio class.

     

  • Come enjoy the awesomeness of Soundtracks from Games, Movies and TV Shows with DJ Tea Time (Joshua Timmons), DJ SurgeMiester (Sergio Betancourt ) and DJ ForGrapeJelly (Steven Escarcega).

     

  • Fine Arts presents a lecture by painter Mary Weatherford. She received her BA from Princeton and MFA from Bard. Weatherford has shown at David Kordansky Gallery in L.A., LAxART in L.A., Brennan & Griffin in New York, and Debs & Co in New York.  In addition, her work is included in collections of MoMA, LACMA, Hammer Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego, and OCMA.
    All are welcome
    Series organized by Photography Director Soo Kim
  • Cesar Garcia – Director and Chief Curator, The Mistake Room
    Glenn Kaino – contemporary artist
    Kris Kuramitsu – Deputy Director and Senior Curator, The Mistake Room

    In conjunction with Otis’ Creative Action program, Big City Forum presents a series of four discussions featuring individuals who reinvent social space and redefine how we engage with each other.

  • “Foregrounds” is a show exploring how we listen to sounds. It utilizes field recordings by blending songs and spoken word pieces with the soundscapes in which we listen to them – whether it be played along with Los Angeles traffic, the sound of a meal being prepared, or waves at the beach. Presented by DJ Derek (Corn), DJ Nasera (Alayon), DJ Max (Miles) of the Otis Radio class.

     

  • HOT & HE∆VY

    Apr 28| Special Event
    More

     

  • Tour I: Artists Studios

    May 03| Continuing Education
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    Fee: $75
    In conjunction with Freeway Studies #2: Inside the Quad

    Curators Meg Linton and Jeseca Dawson lead a tour of artists studios located "inside the quad." Tour includes transportation, lunch, and snacks.

O-Tube

I Search Paper for Sophomore IL

What is an I-Search Paper?

 

An I-Search Paper helps you learn the nature of searching and discovery on a chosen topic. Your goal is to pay attention, track this exploration, and LEARN HOW YOU LEARN. The I-Search Paper should be the story of your search process, including chronological reflections on the phases of research in a narrative form. The I is for YOU. It's the story of YOUR search and what you learned.

The  I-Search paper is NOT a standard research paper. Instead, what you are expected to do is:

  1. Write down a statement about the focus of your research and what you hope to find. Say why you chose the topic and what questions you want to answer. 
  2. Record and describe the chronological step-by-step PROCESS of searching for information. Write in FIRST PERSON (I, Me, My). A journal or notebook would be a good method to use. 
  3. Include the actual search terms you used and how you modified them as you went along. (See Beginning Your Research).
  4. Say which specific databases and search engines you tried. Analyze the results. How many hits did you get? Say how and why you modified your search strategy to get more or less. What did you learn about each database that you tried?
  5. We have a new database that we are piloting just for Sophomore Creative Action / Integrated Learning course. It's call Opposing Viewpoints. Let us know what you think. There are many others listed on the Databases page. This is a good time to experiment with a few.
  6. If you have trouble finding relevant articles or books in the Library, ask a librarian. They have Master's Degrees in research, are more discerning than search engines, and are happy to assist!
  7. Include actual facts and theories that you discovered about your topic as well as idiosyncratic information such as what surprised you. You could say what you already knew about the topic before beginning the research and how that topic may have changed during the research process.
  8. Create a bibliography of at least 3-5 resources which MUST be found through the Otis databases, including the OPAC, and include journal articles and/or books. You should also include websites if you used them, but those will be in addition to the 3-5. You must annotate and evaluate, including the identify the credentials of the author and the type of information (scholarly, popular, etc.)/intented autience. (See CRAAP Detection  and Types of Information.
  9. Remember that research is a creative process. Use your creative thinking skills in the research process. Explore widely, question,  and keep  revising your strategy as you go along seeking information about your topic.