You are here

Gajin Fujita

Los Angeles Times: Los Angeles has new library card art

The Los Angeles Public Library on Friday released a new card design: a mythological Japanese child of superhuman strength whose fiery red body is attired in Dodger blue.

The art is the work of Gajin Fujita, a Los Angeles artist known for merging contemporary street art with the centuries-old style of Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints. His card artwork centers on Kintaro, the folklore character also known as Golden Boy, usually depicted wearing a bib with the kanji character for gold. “I gave him a twist,” Fujita said.

Los Angeles Times: Painter Gajin Fujita keeps his norm-violating spirit

At the summit of a steep incline in Elysian Heights, past an unassuming gate, down a slightly dangerous walkway, you’ll find a concrete landing that serves as the plein-air home studio of Gajin Fujita.

From LA Streets to Gallery Walls

"Graffiti is the foundation on which we built our artistic practices. But beyond graffiti, Los Angeles is what unifies us," says Gajin Fujita ('97 Fine Arts). The Boyle Heights native brings together 11 artists, including himself, for a crash-course in L.A. street-inspired art. Repping different neighborhoods and influenced by different cultures, their works join to create a layered, vibrant, and at times irreverent vision of Los Angeles, which couldn't come at a better time. Roll Call opens today at the L.A.

Alumnus Gajin Fujita

Born in 1972 to Japanese parents, Gajin Fujita ('97) wasted no time in establishing himself in the world of art, first while honing his style as a graffiti artist on the streets of East Los Angeles, and later at L.A. Louver and museums such as LACMA, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art (Kansas City) and several international venues in Switzerland, Greece, and Belgium.

The L.A. Times Reviews Fine Arts Alumnus Gajin Fujita's paintings at L.A. Louver

Brands, symbols and emblems in Gajin Fujita's paintings at L.A. Louver

By David Pagel
 
Ten years ago, billboards across Southern California proclaimed that the baseball team then known as the Anaheim Angels had become the Los Angeles Angels. Fans got mad.
 
Long-standing lovers of the Anaheim Angels felt betrayed. Die-hard Dodgers supporters felt that their turf had been violated. Less passionate observers saw the name change as a corporate maneuver to grab a larger market share.
 

Fine Arts Alumnus Gajin Fujita at the LA Louver

Fine Arts alumnus Gajin Fujita ('97) is showing his work this summer in his solo exhibition “Warriors, Ghosts and Ancient Gods of the Pacific” at the LA Louver.